Unicorns, plus, Deathlight is now an audio play!

Up at Daily Science Fiction this morning, a little thing I wrote about a homeowner association and a unicorn. Enjoy!

Also, if for some reason you missed my story, Deathlight, out in Lightspeed Magazine last year, it’s now been turned into an audio play by the folks over at Fancy Pants Gangsters. They have a number of other short audio plays up at their site as well – enjoy!

 

2016 publications round-up post

And now that I think that everything due out this year is out, time for the obligatory end-of-year round up post.

For the second year in a row, my most popular work seems to have been in the non-fiction/Best Related Work category, specifically the Disney Read-Watch over at Tor.com, which wrapped up this year with a post on Moana.  No word yet on whether I’ll be covering future Disney feature length animated films – my best guess is maybe – but I will be continuing with two additional projects in 2017.

Those posts ended up eating considerably more time than I’d expected, but still, although this was (apart from those posts) not a good year for writing, it was a decent year for publication: nine short stories, four flash fiction pieces, and seven poems.

If you missed them earlier, here’s a list:

Short fiction:

DeathlightLightspeed Magazine, May 2016.  Arguably the story that garnered the widest range of responses from readers, it was also the one hard science fiction story I managed to publish this year.

The Middle Child’s Practical Guide to Surviving a Fairy TaleFireside,  May 2016. Let’s face it, I was bound to write something like this eventually.  Even if I am an oldest, not middle, child.

Cat Play, Metaphorosis, January 2016. A story set where I live.

My Own Damn HeavenBourbon Penn, March 2016. A story definitely not set where I live.

The Huntsmen, Truancy, with part one published in March 2016 and part two in December 2016 (part one has a link to part two.)

“Mistletoe and Copper,” An Alphabet of Embers, Stone Bird Press, July 2016. The anthology is available from Amazon and Barnes and Noble, and is eligible for the Locus Award for Best Anthology, as are two other collections listed below – Clowns: The Unlikely Coulrophobia Remix and Fae Visions of the Mediterranean.

Coffee, Love and Leaves, Capricious SF, July 2016. Coffee appeared in a number of tales on this list, but in only one title.

DragonboneDaily Science Fiction, July 2016.

The Cat Signal, Daily Science Fiction, August 2016.

I gotta be honest here: when I sent this one off, I had a bad feeling that it might signal – pardon the pun – the end of what’s been a pretty decent relationship with Daily Science Fiction.  On the other hand, it has this sentence:

If I were a bitter person, I’d say that that my Cat Signal fell on the wrong clowns.

The editors still seem to be speaking to me.

Flash fiction:

“The Game,” in Clowns: The Unlikely Coulrophobia Remix, January 2016.  Available at Amazon or Barnes and Noble. The one story on this list loosely based on a real event. Very loosely based.

Nine Songs, in Daily Science Fiction, August 2016.

Souls, in Daily Science Fiction, October 2016.

Hundreds, in Daily Science Fiction, December 2016

(The last two are part of a long running fairy tale series.)

Poetry:

“The Heart of the Flame,” in Fae Visions of the Mediterranean, May 2016. Possibly the least read piece I published this year, in an anthology that I think deserved a lot more attention, and which is still available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

At the Center, in Kaleidotrope, June 2016.

“Madrepore,” in Spelling the Hours, July 2016. Arguably the second least read piece I published this year, this is part of another project deserving of attention: a chapbook of poems celebrating women scientists. It’s available from Amazon, and is one of my few poems that explores marine biology.

Hamelin, A Remnant, in Though the Gate, August 2016.

Three Nuts, in Through the Gate, October 2016

After Midnight, in Mythic Delirium, November 2016

Ice/Shadow, in Strange Horizons, December 2016, the hands down trickiest poem to write this year and probably the one the I was proudest of, though I’m also deeply fond of “The Heart of the Flame” for purely personal reasons.

 

 

 

 

The Huntsmen

The third issue of Truancy is out, and with it, the second part of my short story, “The Huntsmen,” a retelling of “The Twelve Huntsmen,” a tale originally collected by the Brothers Grimm in the early 19th century.

As a kid, I loved the story because it featured girls Doing Things – cross dressing, tricking lions, hunting, tricking adults – all great stuff.  It took me years to realize just how weird the story is, even apart from the cross-dressing, and to find myself asking questions. A lot of questions. Which turned into several short stories, with at least one more coming up in Daily Science Fiction next year, and this one:

Part one.

Part two 

An Alphabet of Embers

An Alphabet of Embers, with my little fairy tale “Mistletoe and Copper,” is finally out.

The anthology has already received quite a bit of praise from early reviewers, and also includes works by Nisi Shawl, Zen Cho, Yoon Ha Lee, Kari Sperring and Amal El-Mohtar. I received an early copy, and found that it’s a book that is probably best sipped and read in small doses – easy enough since the pieces are all very short, between 500 to 1500 words. I’m biased, of course, but it’s a lovely anthology to be part of.

Enjoy!