2017 Roundup

Time for the obligatory end of year round up of Various Things I Published/Was Involved in During 2017, a year where we learned that if you don’t write all that much in 2016, you won’t publish all that much in 2017.

I know. Who would have thunk?

But it wasn’t a completely empty year either, including, as it did:

One novella:

Probably the publication I was proudest of this year, an epic, novella length poem (yes, about 28,000 words), Through Immortal Shadows Singing, published by Papaveria Press.

Available at Amazon, Barnes and Noble and multiple other outlets. The SFPA reviewed it here, and a few Goodreads readers chimed in here.

One short story:

You Will Never Know What Opens, in Lightspeed Magazine, December 2017. Portal fantasy. Hasn’t been out long enough to garner that many responses, but Charles Payseur was kind enough to give a thoughtful review here.

Six flash fiction pieces – not all of them in Daily Science Fiction!

The Lion, in Daily Science Fiction, March 2017.  A little fairy tale.

We Need to Talk About the Unicorn in Your Back Yard, Daily Science Fiction, April 2017.  Humor. Possibly my most popular short fiction piece from last year. An audio version is coming up from Toasted Cake, but in the meantime, if you missed it, it’s a short read. I promise.

The Witch in the Tower, Fireside, July 2017. One of my personal favorites from the year. Another little fairy tale.

Stealing Tales, Daily Science Fiction, November 2017. Another little fairy tale.

“Gingerbread Smoke,” in Typhon: A Monster Anthology Vol 2., by Pantheon Magazine. This was probably the hands down hardest piece of mine to find this year, bar none, but I promise: the anthology really truly is available through Amazon now, and is forthcoming from other outlets shortly, and the anthology overall is well worth the hunt.

Pipers Piping, Daily Science Fiction, December 2017. A little Christmas story.

Five poems:

The Study, in Mithila Review: The Journal of International Science Fiction and Fantasy

The Stained Oak Leaves, in Umbel & Panicle.

Euryale at the Shore, in Polu Texni

Hunter, in Mythic Delirium

Burning, in Wild Musette (this one is literary/non-speculative)

Related Work:

On Fairy Tales: A weekly essay series on Tor.com discussing fairy tales and various works inspired by fairy tales.

The Pixar Rewatch. A sequel to the 2015-2016 Disney Read-watch, this monthly essay series on Tor.com explored the Pixar movies – discussing development and financial details, animation, other tidbits and of course the films themselves.

The Secret of NIMH.  Another add-on to the Disney Read-watch, this essay appeared over at Uncanny, and focused on Don Bluth and his first animated picture.

And speaking of the Disney Read-watch, the very last post in that series – a wrap-up post – appeared in January 2017, making the entire series – technically – still eligible for Best Related Work awards.

And one more essay: Where Should You Start Reading the Chronicles of Narnia, which generated several comments.

Dramatic Presentation (short)

Deathlight, which originally appeared in Lightspeed back in 2016, was turned into an audio play this year by Fancy Pants Gangsters.

Onwards to 2018!

Hunter, Euryale at the Shore, Worldcon plans

Two new poems by me out today: Hunter, in Mythic Delirium, and Euryale at the Shore, in Polu Texni.  Both came to me when I was contemplating monsters.

Enjoy!

In slightly related news, my plans for Worldcon 75, held in Helsinki, Finland this year, are nearly finalized. I’m tentatively scheduled to be on a couple of panels there, including one about speculative poetry.  This will be my first trip to Finland – and, if I manage to sneak out to Estonia while I’m there, Estonia. Looking forward to it.

 

 

Through Immortal Shadows Singing

I’m very pleased to announce that Through Immortal Shadows Singing, my epic novella in poetry, is now available for preorder from Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and many other retailers!

And by epic, I do mean epic – the 170 pages do include a table of contents and things like that, but this is about 167 pages of poetry.

Here’s the blurb:

Maligned for her beauty, cursed for her role in causing a war, she has rarely been given her chance to tell her tale. Now Helen of Troy’s voice breaks free, offering a new vision in this epic lyrical sequence that follows her journey from Sparta to Troy, from earth to hell, and back.  A stunning debut novella from Mari Ness, THROUGH IMMORTAL SHADOWS SINGING will transform your view of Helen and the Trojan War, in a soaring poem of love and war, healing and pain, hatred and triumph.

And here’s two small tastes of the poetry inside:

I walk, knowing that the queen of death

may name me sister, that the

cry of the hunt

shares my blood, that I share a father

with the Fates.

#

Bone on silver,

silver on bone,

the sound of a harp

the memory of dream.

Available April 25.

2016 publications round-up post

And now that I think that everything due out this year is out, time for the obligatory end-of-year round up post.

For the second year in a row, my most popular work seems to have been in the non-fiction/Best Related Work category, specifically the Disney Read-Watch over at Tor.com, which wrapped up this year with a post on Moana.  No word yet on whether I’ll be covering future Disney feature length animated films – my best guess is maybe – but I will be continuing with two additional projects in 2017.

Those posts ended up eating considerably more time than I’d expected, but still, although this was (apart from those posts) not a good year for writing, it was a decent year for publication: nine short stories, four flash fiction pieces, and seven poems.

If you missed them earlier, here’s a list:

Short fiction:

DeathlightLightspeed Magazine, May 2016.  Arguably the story that garnered the widest range of responses from readers, it was also the one hard science fiction story I managed to publish this year.

The Middle Child’s Practical Guide to Surviving a Fairy TaleFireside,  May 2016. Let’s face it, I was bound to write something like this eventually.  Even if I am an oldest, not middle, child.

Cat Play, Metaphorosis, January 2016. A story set where I live.

My Own Damn HeavenBourbon Penn, March 2016. A story definitely not set where I live.

The Huntsmen, Truancy, with part one published in March 2016 and part two in December 2016 (part one has a link to part two.)

“Mistletoe and Copper,” An Alphabet of Embers, Stone Bird Press, July 2016. The anthology is available from Amazon and Barnes and Noble, and is eligible for the Locus Award for Best Anthology, as are two other collections listed below – Clowns: The Unlikely Coulrophobia Remix and Fae Visions of the Mediterranean.

Coffee, Love and Leaves, Capricious SF, July 2016. Coffee appeared in a number of tales on this list, but in only one title.

DragonboneDaily Science Fiction, July 2016.

The Cat Signal, Daily Science Fiction, August 2016.

I gotta be honest here: when I sent this one off, I had a bad feeling that it might signal – pardon the pun – the end of what’s been a pretty decent relationship with Daily Science Fiction.  On the other hand, it has this sentence:

If I were a bitter person, I’d say that that my Cat Signal fell on the wrong clowns.

The editors still seem to be speaking to me.

Flash fiction:

“The Game,” in Clowns: The Unlikely Coulrophobia Remix, January 2016.  Available at Amazon or Barnes and Noble. The one story on this list loosely based on a real event. Very loosely based.

Nine Songs, in Daily Science Fiction, August 2016.

Souls, in Daily Science Fiction, October 2016.

Hundreds, in Daily Science Fiction, December 2016

(The last two are part of a long running fairy tale series.)

Poetry:

“The Heart of the Flame,” in Fae Visions of the Mediterranean, May 2016. Possibly the least read piece I published this year, in an anthology that I think deserved a lot more attention, and which is still available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

At the Center, in Kaleidotrope, June 2016.

“Madrepore,” in Spelling the Hours, July 2016. Arguably the second least read piece I published this year, this is part of another project deserving of attention: a chapbook of poems celebrating women scientists. It’s available from Amazon, and is one of my few poems that explores marine biology.

Hamelin, A Remnant, in Though the Gate, August 2016.

Three Nuts, in Through the Gate, October 2016

After Midnight, in Mythic Delirium, November 2016

Ice/Shadow, in Strange Horizons, December 2016, the hands down trickiest poem to write this year and probably the one the I was proudest of, though I’m also deeply fond of “The Heart of the Flame” for purely personal reasons.