An Alphabet of Embers

An Alphabet of Embers, with my little fairy tale “Mistletoe and Copper,” is finally out.

The anthology has already received quite a bit of praise from early reviewers, and also includes works by Nisi Shawl, Zen Cho, Yoon Ha Lee, Kari Sperring and Amal El-Mohtar. I received an early copy, and found that it’s a book that is probably best sipped and read in small doses – easy enough since the pieces are all very short, between 500 to 1500 words. I’m biased, of course, but it’s a lovely anthology to be part of.

Enjoy!

At the center

My latest poem, At the Center, just popped up at Kaleidotrope. Also in this issue, a really lovely retelling of Tam Lin, “Of Peach Trees and Coral Red Roses,” by Mina Li, and other exquisite work by Chloie Piveral, T.D. Walker, Anna Zumbro, Sean R. Robinson, David C. Kopaska-Merkel, and Theresa Lockhart.

Enjoy!

The Heart of the Flame

Also out today (it seems to be a beginning of the month sort of thing), Fae Visions of the Mediterranean, which contains my poem, “The Heart of the Flame,” set in Sicily.

The rest of the anthology contains work by Maria Grech Ganado, Claude Lalumiere, and many others. It’s a beautiful anthology, and I’m pleased to be part of it. You can buy it at Amazon (Kindle and paperback) or Barnes and Noble  (Nook and paperback).

Enjoy!

The Middle Child’s Practical Guide to Surviving a Fairy Tale/Deathlight

The latest issue of Fireside Fiction just went live, and with it, my short story, The Middle Child’s Practical Guide to Surviving a Fairy Tale, the story I read at last year’s World Fantasy Con and this year’s ICFA. Originally written as a Twitter joke, it slowly grew into a blog post, as these things do, and then mutated into a short story.

Also just going live, the latest issue of Lightspeed, available for subscribers or as an individual issue, which includes my short story, “Deathlight,” along with new short stories by An Owomoyela,  Seanan McGuire, and Wole Talabi, reprints from a number of well known names including Tim Pratt and Elizabeth Hand, and Hugh Howey’s “The Plagiarist.”

I may have a bit more to say about this one once my individual story goes live on the web on May 17, but for now, I’ll just note that the two stories are, I think, quite different – and not just because one is more or less fantasy (if a bit snarky about it) and the other marks my return to hard science fiction.

Enjoy!